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NFL Red Zone Live


Watch NFL Red Zone Live online and free


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NFL RedZone (stylized as NFL RedZone from NFL Network) is an American sports television channel owned and operated by NFL Network since 2009. As a "special" game-day exclusive, it broadcasts on Sundays during the NFL regular season from 1:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern (10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Pacific), or when the last afternoon window game ends. RedZone provides "whip around" simulcast coverage of all Sunday afternoon games airing in-progress on CBS and Fox.
RedZone is based out of the NFL Network studios and is hosted by Scott Hanson,[1] and airs commercial-free. The channel prides itself on showing "every touchdown from every game," and is closely linked to Fantasy Football,[1] reporting superlatives and tracking various statistical accomplishments throughout the afternoon. RedZone monitors coverage of the traditional Sunday afternoon 1:00 p.m. "early" games and 4:05/4:25 p.m. "late" games.
RedZone is offered by numerous cable providers, Dish Network, and Verizon Wireless smartphones, but specifically is not available on DirecTV, which offers its own version (Red Zone Channel hosted by Andrew Siciliano) as part of NFL Sunday Ticket.
RedZone is also broadcast live internationally in the United Kingdom on the Sky Sports NFL television channel, and in Italy on DAZN, beginning at 6:00 p.m. GMT every Sunday evening and running through the full seven hours to 1:00 a.m. GMT. It is a direct simulcast of the American feed, with no commercial breaks, live coverage of both the early and late games and Hanson hosting.
ESPN Goal Line, a channel which debuted one year later, broadcast college football with a similar format and style until the end of the 2019 season. The name "RedZone" derives from the term red zone, which is the part of the football field between the 20-yard line and the goal line.

At 1:00 p.m. (Eastern) the RedZone program begins, and immediately dives into live look-ins across the league. Host Scott Hanson gives a brief introduction of the day, highlighting key developing stories, as teams are typically already lining up for opening kickoff. When the first kickoff takes place, Hanson will say "Seven hours of commercial-free football... starts now!" Coverage of the opening kickoffs and a cursory look at early drives that are being established are the initial focus. Coverage is normally shown in full-screen, with one particular game as the primary focus for the moment. The coverage is a direct simulcast of the CBS or Fox broadcast feed and commentary, with only occasional and usually brief voice-over comments by Hanson as needed. Coverage sometimes switches to split-screen, with two, three, four ("quad-box"[1]), five ("Penta-box"), or as many as eight ("Octo-box"[1]) game feeds being shown simultaneously. Producers in the studio monitor all game feeds in-progress, and decide which game to feature at any given moment. NFL television rules are exempted for RedZone, and live look-ins of games that are subject to blackout are still allowed to be aired in all markets.
Whenever a team enters the red zone, the coverage will switch to a full-screen live look-in of that game's television broadcast. It will attempt to cover a potential scoring result (touchdown or field goal). Meanwhile, the other games continue to be monitored, in case the need arises to switch to another feed at short notice. Field goal attempts from outside the red zone are sometimes shown, either live or in replay, if they pose significance to the outcome of the respective game.
As the games enter halftime, the coverage shifts over to games still finishing up the second quarter, even if there are no teams in the red zone. Some noncompetitive games that would otherwise not be looked at may take the attention for a few minutes, in order to fill the broadcast with as much live football coverage as possible. As soon as better games start returning for the third quarter, second half kickoffs typically take a priority.
If there are no teams in the red zone at a given moment, the focus may shift to a team on a strong offensive drive, or an otherwise important game of the day. Despite the channel's moniker, a team does not have to be inside the red zone for the focus and coverage to shift to that game. During the latter portion of the season, extra sidebar attention may be given to teams fighting for playoff berths, and the respective status thereof. The "whip around" coverage also is used to show quick replays of major plays such as turnovers, deep pass completions, very long runs from scrimmage, kickoff/punt return touchdowns, and other potentially interesting or important key plays. The "Game Rewind" feature is sometimes used to replay a significant play that resulted in a particular team entering the red zone.